Aug 22

As a sysadmin, I should always search and check for errors on every machine that I manage. Unfortunately one of them has an Adaptec 5405 which I forgot to monitor using nagios and just like Murphy’s Law says – “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong” – something went wrong and I have lost information. Not a really big problem because I have backups of everything but it could have been avoided if I had monitored the status of the Adaptec just the way I do with software raid arrays (/proc/mdstat rules!).

So I developed another simple script using Perl (again :-P ) to check the status of all the available arrays.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use warnings;
 
my $adaptec_tool = "/usr/src/cmdline/arcconf";
 
my $dump = `$adaptec_tool getconfig 1 ld`;
my @raids = ();
 
while ($dump =~ /Logical device name.*?:.*?([a-z0-9]+).*?raid level.*?:.*?([0-9]+).*?status of logical device.*?:.*?([a-z0-9]+)/gsi) {
        push @raids, {"name" => $1, "raidlevel" => $2, "status" => $3};
 
}
 
foreach my $raid (@raids)
{
        if ( $$raid{status} ne "Optimal" )
        {
                print "Critical: Raid not Optimal! (Array Name: $$raid{name}, Level: $$raid{raidlevel}, Status: $$raid{status})\n";
                exit(1);
        }
}
 
print "OK: All arrays in optimal shape\n";
exit (0);

You just need to download the “Adaptec Storage Manager” to connect to the RAID card and read the status. You can use this link to do it.

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Aug 22

I’ve been trying to learn how to use Perl to do some simple stuff whenever I just cannot use PHP. PERL is a language that I have access on every machine under my control, but unfortunately I cannot say the same thing about PHP and that is why I have decided to start learning using this ultra flexible language.

Now, the first thing I have developed (aside from the popular Hello World – LOL) was a simple script to check for website updates. This was particularly useful to check for updates on a website related to a contest.

use strict;
use warnings;
use LWP::Simple;
use Digest::MD5 qw(md5 md5_hex md5_base64);
use Encode qw(encode_utf8);
 
my $link                = 'http://www.foobar.com';
my $email_from          = 'foo@bar.com';
my $email               = 'bar@foo.com';
my $email_subject       = 'Website Changed!';
my $email_body          = 'Hello! I just want to let you know that the website ' 
                          . $link . ' have just changed!';
my $tmp_file            = '/tmp/stored_hash';
 
my $web_source = get( $link );
my $current_hash =  md5_hex(encode_utf8($web_source));
 
if(-e $tmp_file)
{
        open FH, "<$tmp_file" or die "could not open: $!\n";
        my $mod_hash = <FH>;
        if( $current_hash ne $mod_hash )
        {
                open(MAIL, "|/usr/sbin/sendmail -t");
                print MAIL "To: $email\n";
                print MAIL "From: $email_from\n";
                print MAIL "Subject: $email_subject\n\n";
                print MAIL "$email_body\n";
                close(MAIL);
 
        }
        close FH;
}
        open FH, ">$tmp_file" or die "could not create: $!\n";
        print FH $current_hash;
        close FH;

Just replace the email and link stuff to suite your needs and you are all set! Enjoy!

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