Simple script to check expiry dates on a java keystore (.jks) file

Here in my company we regularly need to check for expired certificates or just to have a proactive management checking which certificates are close to their expiry dates and issue new ones to avoid service disruption.

For that reason I’ve created a simple bash script which can be used in conjunction with nagios to check for expiring certicates.

#!/bin/sh
 
########################################################
#
#       Check certificates inside a java keystore
#
########################################################
TIMEOUT="timeout -k 10s 5s "
KEYTOOL="$TIMEOUT keytool"
THRESHOLD_IN_DAYS="30"
KEYSTORE=""
PASSWORD=""
RET=0
 
ARGS=`getopt -o "p:k:t:" -l "password:,keystore:,threshold:" -n "$0" -- "$@"`
 
function usage {
        echo "Usage: $0 --keystore <keystore> [--password <password>] [--threshold <number of days until expiry>]"
        exit
}
 
 
 
function start {
        CURRENT=`date +%s`
 
        THRESHOLD=$(($CURRENT + ($THRESHOLD_IN_DAYS*24*60*60)))
        if [ $THRESHOLD -le $CURRENT ]; then
                echo "[ERROR] Invalid date."
                exit 1
        fi
        echo "Looking for certificates inside the keystore $(basename $KEYSTORE) expiring in $THRESHOLD_IN_DAYS day(s)..."
 
        $KEYTOOL -list -v -keystore "$KEYSTORE"  $PASSWORD 2>&1 > /dev/null
        if [ $? -gt 0 ]; then echo "Error opening the keystore."; exit 1; fi
 
        $KEYTOOL -list -v -keystore "$KEYSTORE"  $PASSWORD | grep Alias | awk '{print $3}' | while read ALIAS
        do
                #Iterate through all the certificate alias
                EXPIRACY=`$KEYTOOL -list -v -keystore "$KEYSTORE"  $PASSWORD -alias $ALIAS | grep Valid`
                UNTIL=`$KEYTOOL -list -v -keystore "$KEYSTORE"  $PASSWORD -alias $ALIAS | grep Valid | perl -ne 'if(/until: (.*?)\n/) { print "$1\n"; }'`
                UNTIL_SECONDS=`date -d "$UNTIL" +%s`
                REMAINING_DAYS=$(( ($UNTIL_SECONDS -  $(date +%s)) / 60 / 60 / 24 ))
                if [ $THRESHOLD -le $UNTIL_SECONDS ]; then
                        echo "[OK]      Certificate $ALIAS expires in '$UNTIL' ($REMAINING_DAYS day(s) remaining)."
                else
                        echo "[WARNING] Certificate $ALIAS expires in '$UNTIL' ($REMAINING_DAYS day(s) remaining)."
                        RET=1
                fi
 
        done
        echo "Finished..."
        exit $RET
}
 
eval set -- "$ARGS"
 
while true
do
        case "$1" in
                -p|--password)
                        if [ -n "$2" ]; then PASSWORD=" -storepass $2"; else echo "Invalid password"; exit 1; fi
                        shift 2;;
                -k|--keystore)
                        if [ ! -f "$2" ]; then echo "Keystore not found: $1"; exit 1; else KEYSTORE=$2; fi
                        shift 2;;
                -t|--threshold)
                        if [ -n "$2" ] && [[ $2 =~ ^[0-9]+$ ]]; then THRESHOLD_IN_DAYS=$2; else echo "Invalid threshold"; exit 1; fi
                        shift 2;;
                --)
                        shift
                        break;;
        esac
done
 
if [ -n "$KEYSTORE" ]
then
        start
else
        usage
fi

All you have to do is call it like this:

./checkCertificate --keystore [YOUR_KEYSTORE_FILE] --password [YOUR_PASSWORD] --threshold [THRESHOLD_IN_DAYS]

The threshold indicates how many days are left until the expiry date is reached. I’m sure that there are several other ways of doing it but this is my own :-)

Use nagios to check your raid arrays

As a sysadmin, I should always search and check for errors on every machine that I manage. Unfortunately one of them has an Adaptec 5405 which I forgot to monitor using nagios and just like Murphy’s Law says – “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong” – something went wrong and I have lost information. Not a really big problem because I have backups of everything but it could have been avoided if I had monitored the status of the Adaptec just the way I do with software raid arrays (/proc/mdstat rules!).

So I developed another simple script using Perl (again :-P ) to check the status of all the available arrays.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use warnings;
 
my $adaptec_tool = "/usr/src/cmdline/arcconf";
 
my $dump = `$adaptec_tool getconfig 1 ld`;
my @raids = ();
 
while ($dump =~ /Logical device name.*?:.*?([a-z0-9]+).*?raid level.*?:.*?([0-9]+).*?status of logical device.*?:.*?([a-z0-9]+)/gsi) {
        push @raids, {"name" => $1, "raidlevel" => $2, "status" => $3};
 
}
 
foreach my $raid (@raids)
{
        if ( $$raid{status} ne "Optimal" )
        {
                print "Critical: Raid not Optimal! (Array Name: $$raid{name}, Level: $$raid{raidlevel}, Status: $$raid{status})\n";
                exit(1);
        }
}
 
print "OK: All arrays in optimal shape\n";
exit (0);

You just need to download the “Adaptec Storage Manager” to connect to the RAID card and read the status. You can use this link to do it.

Script básico para NAGIOS para monitorização de Portas

Estive com uns problemas na empresa relacionados com o sendmail.
Quando nada fazia prever, o sendmail simplesmente crasha começando a recusar activamente todos os pedidos de envio de email.

Criei um script genérico para verificar se uma determinada porta de um servidor está a responder. Basta editar o endereço, porta e opcionalmente definir um timeout máximo para o pedido.

#!/usr/bin/php -q
<?
 
/*****************************************************
 
    Check For Open Ports - David Gouveia
 
*****************************************************/
 
$address = '127.0.0.1';
$port = 25;
$timeout = 5;  //Max time to wait before give up.
 
$checkport = fsockopen($address, $port, $errnum, $errstr, $timeout);
 
if(!$checkport){
        print "CRITICAL: Host $address at port $port not responding!\n";
        fclose($checkport);
        exit(2);
}
 
print "OK: Host $address at port $port is responding!\n";
fclose($checkport);
exit(0);
 
?>

Coloquem na pasta dos plugins e não se esqueçam de dar as permissões correctas (755).
Alternativamente podem passar o valor do IP e porta como argumentos via consola.

basta trocar isto :

    $address = ’127.0.0.1′;
    $port = 25;

por isto :

    $address = $argv[1];
    $port = $argv[2]